• Facebook - White Circle

920.729.4300

info@pheifer.com

CONTACT US

599 Bondow Drive

Neenah, WI 54956

An Equal Opportunity Employer

© 2023 by Pheifer Brothers Construction Company, Inc.

2019 ToolBox Talks

WEEK OF 12/16/19

PREVENTING EQUIPMENT DAMAGE

The goal of operating safely is firstly to protect life and secondary is protecting property. The construction industry can not only be hazardous to workers, but equipment damage incidents can be frequent and costly...

WEEK OF 12/9/19

ERGONOMICS/STRETCHING

Strains, sprains, and tears are the most common types of workplace injuries every year. There were 420,870 of these cases requiring days away from work in 2014 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics...

WEEK OF 12/2/19

FALL PROTECTION

Falls are a leading cause of serious injuries and fatalities that occur in the workplace. According to statistics published the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 887 workers died as a result of a fall in 2017. The construction industry in particular experiences a large number of these fatalities from falls....

WEEK OF 11/25/19

HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATIONS

Heavy equipment is used on many different kinds of work sites all around the world. This equipment is very effective for the job it was designed to do, but it can also be very hazardous...

WEEK OF 11/18/19

ELECTRICAL SAFETY

Electrical outlets aren’t always available in the exact location where they are needed. When the need for electricity is temporary, extension cords can be a quick way to supply the necessary power to get a job done...

WEEK OF 11/11/19

SLIPS, TRIPS AND FALLS

We have all experienced slipping, tripping, stumbling or falling. Usually the only result is that you feel silly, embarrassed, and perhaps got a scrape or bruise. But falls kill 1,200 people at work a year. They are the biggest cause of accidental death in the workplace...

WEEK OF 11/4/19

FALLING OBJECTS

Being Struck by Falling Objects is a leading source of construction fatalities. Even a small object falling from a height can cause serious or fatal injuries...

WEEK OF 10/28/19

HAZARD COMMUNICATION

OSHA’s hazard communication standard, also known as the “employee right-to-know” standard, is designed to help protect workers from the hazards of exposures to harmful chemicals...

WEEK OF 10/21/19

COLD STRESS

Cold temperatures and increased wind speed (wind chill) cause heat to leave the body more quickly, putting workers at risk of cold stress. Anyone working in the cold may be at risk, e.g., workers in freezers, outdoor agriculture and construction...

WEEK OF 10/14/19

FALL PROTECTION - LADDER SAFETY

Ryan was applying sheetrock mud to a wall and was standing on the top rung of a 12-foot ladder. He lost his balance, fell to the concrete floor, and landed on his head. He suffered a major head injury. Ladders are involved in many incidents like this, some of which are fatal. Your life literally can depend on knowing how to inspect, use and care for this tool...

WEEK OF 10/7/19

EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN

A construction site can be a difficult and dangerous place to work. A good emergency plan will help people take quick and effective action in the event of an emergency. It will help in easing the severity of the situation and limit the consequences...

WEEK OF 9/30/19

ELECTRICAL SAFETY

The hazards associated with electricity affect the majority of workplaces. Whether you are in general industry, construction, or even farming- electrical hazards are present. It is important to be able to recognize the electrical hazards around you and know how to mitigate them....

WEEK OF 9/23/19

SIGNALER SAFETY

The crane operator is ultimately responsible for all aspects of crane safety; however, he depends upon the qualified crane “signaler” to assist him by being the operator’s eyes and ears on the ground...

WEEK OF 9/16/19

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is clothing or equipment designed to protect workers from physical hazards when on a worksite. PPE should only be considered as a last line of defense between a hazard and the worker. Attempts to control workplace risks and hazards should always be addressed first...

WEEK OF 9/9/19

SILICA DUST

Silica is found in many materials common on construction sites, including sand, concrete, rock, mortar, and brick. When workers cut, grind, abrasive blast, jackhammer or perform other tasks that disturb these materials, dust containing crystalline silica can be released into the air...

WEEK OF 9/2/19

CONCRETE POUR AND BLOWOUTS

Concrete mix and pour operations pose significant possible hazards to employees. Keep in mind, even the most basic of concrete worksites can be filled with safety hazards.

  1. Chemical burns

  2. Respiratory irritation, illness, or infection

  3. Injuries for improper lifting

  4. Form blowout

  5. Injuries from falling objects

  6. Falls from elevated platform

WEEK OF 8/26/19

HAND AND POWER TOOL SAFETY

Hand and power tools are a common part of our everyday lives and are present in nearly every industry. However, these simple tools can be hazardous and have the potential for causing severe injuries when used or maintained improperly. The employer is responsible for the safe condition of tools and equipment used by employees, but the employees have the responsibility for properly using and maintaining tools.

WEEK OF 8/19/19

FALL PROTECTION

Falls are a leading cause of serious injuries and fatalities that occur in the workplace. According to statistics published the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 887 workers died as a result of a fall in 2017. The construction industry in particular experiences a large number of these fatalities from falls.

WEEK OF 8/12/19

OSHA INSPECTION PROCEDURES

OSHA SITE VISITS: OSHA may make inspections to any work site and rarely will advance notice be provided. These inspections may cover the entire workplace or just a few operations.

BEST PRACTICE – Because OSHA visits are unannounced, ensure that the work site is compliant at all times.

WEEK OF 8/5/19

WORKING NEAR OR OVER WATER

Many projects find us working near water. Working on a construction site that is located over or near water comes with a set of very serious dangers. Even if you are a good swimmer, working around water means that you are exposed to many risks.In the event a personal flotation device is not worn or malfunctions, permanent brain damage can occur to a drowning victim within three to four minutes due to oxygen deprivation... 

WEEK OF 7/29/19

EXCAVATION SAFETY

Cave-ins and slough-offs are a major cause of deaths in the construction industry each year. An excavation is defined as any dug-out area of ground other than a trench, tunnel or excavated shaft as a result of removing material. Proper planning is important when a groundbreaking operation is going to take place. Many hazards can be eliminated or mitigated properly when identified in the planning stage of digging operations...

WEEK OF 7/22/19

CHEMICAL SAFETY

More than 32 million workers (which includes more than 20% of the entire U.S. workforce) are exposed to hazardous chemical products in the workplace. According to OSHA, 650,000 different chemicals are present in more than 3 million American workplaces...

WEEK OF 7/15/19

SLING SAFETY

Suspended loads can present many hazards to our workers such as struck-by, falling object, and caught between injuries. The equipment we use to hoist loads such as materials or equipment must meet be inspected prior to each use. Please review the information below to understand the OSHA requirements for hoisting equipment...

WEEK OF 7/8/19

LIGHTNING SAFETY

Lightning is a serious hazard both on and off the job. There is an average of 25 million lightning strikes that occur in the United States each year alone. Individuals need to identify and plan for the potential of lightning before beginning a work activity or any leisure activity during storm season...

WEEK OF 7/1/19

HEAT 

Different people react differently to heat. Some symptoms of heat exhaustion are headache, heat cramps, weakness, dizziness or nausea. You may have blurred vision, pass out, suffer convulsions and ultimately death.

High humidity adds to the suffering. Your body will not cool down as much from sweating because the sweat cannot evaporate as efficiently. Everyone is more irritable and makes more mistakes when the temperature is above the comfort zone. Be aware of the conditions and be more careful...

WEEK OF 6/24/19

SLIPS TRIPS AND FALLS

Slips, trips and falls constitute a large majority of general industry accidents. Second only to motor vehicle accidents, slips, trips and falls are the most frequent accidents leading to personal injury. Slips, trips and falls can result in head injuries, back injuries, broken bones, sprained muscles, cuts and lacerations or even death...

WEEK OF 6/17/19

SUBSTANCE ABUSE

Construction work involves high-risk activities. To work safely everyone must be physically and mentally alert. On site, it’s up to you and your teams to manage the risks associated with alcohol and other drugs...

WEEK OF 6/10/19

PILE DRIVING

Pile drivers use heavy weights and a tremendous amount of force to pound poles deeply into the ground. The sheer power of a pile driver and the potential for damaging below-ground features underscores the important role of safety in piledriving operations. Besides the potential for injuries to workers, an incorrectly placed pole can compromise the structural integrity of nearby foundations or ground features...

WEEK OF 6/3/19

ERGONOMICS

Stretching can help prepare your body for work. When stretching regularly you can help prevent sprain and strain injuries. You can do this by targeting muscles that you use on a daily basis. When stretching is not done regularly the muscles shorten and you are at higher risk of injury then someone who stretches on a regular basis...

WEEK OF 5/27/19

SILICA DUST

Crystalline silica is a common mineral in the earth's crust and is found in many types of rock including sand, quartz, and granite. Silica is present in both work and non-work environments, and exposure to crystalline silica dust has long been known to cause a disease called silicosis. When you inhale crystalline silica the lung tissue reacts by developing fibrous tissue around trapped silica particles. This condition of the lung is called silicosis...

WEEK OF 5/20/19

WELDING AND CUTTING

Welding, cutting, and brazing are different hot work techniques used to bond, cut, solder, or form metals at high temperatures. Specific precautions must be taken during this high-hazard work to prevent personal injury and workplace damage. This safety topic is focused on general awareness of workplace welding, cutting and brazing hazards and the precautions that should be followed to ensure a safe and productive workplace..

WEEK OF 5/13/19

PPE

There are over 75 OSHA Standards that address the need and use for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). PPE is the equipment you the worker wear to reduce exposure to hazards.  Worksites today generally are safer than ever, thanks largely to the widespread use of PPE designed to keep workers safe and injury free; however, PPE should be the last line of defense...

WEEK OF 5/6/19

FALLING OBJECTS

Objects and tools dropped from higher levels is a serious hazard for many work-sites. In 2016, there were 255 workplace fatalities due to falling objects in the United States according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Furthermore, OSHA estimates that over 50,000 “struck-by a falling object” incidents occur each year on construction sites alone...

WEEK OF 4/29/19

HAZARD COMMUNICATION

OSHA’s hazard communication standard (1926.59), also known as the “employee right-to-know” standard, is designed to help protect workers from the hazards of exposures to harmful chemicals. An important section of that standard has requirements for labeling containers of hazardous products. Here are some of the major requirements of that standard that are intended to protect you and me...

WEEK OF 4/22/19

VIOLENCE IN THE WORKPLACE

Workplace violence can happen anywhere, any time. It can come from a co-worker or a stranger. And it isn’t limited to physical assault. Workplace violence is any form of threatening or disruptive behavior. It can be as simple as a gesture, such as a raised fist, or as complicated as sabotage...

WEEK OF 4/15/19

FALL PROTECTION

Falls are the leading cause of death in construction. Falls took the lives of 699 construction workers in 2013 alone. The majority of these fatal falls (82%) were falls to a lower level. Of the lower level falls, about 25% were from 10 feet or less while 75% were from heights of 11 feet and higher (with 55% falling between 11-29 feet and 20% falling 30 feet or more)...

WEEK OF 4/8/19

EMERGENCY ACTION PLAN

Even with the best plans and procedures in place, accidents can still happen.  Advanced preparations make all the difference to minimize panic and confusion...

WEEK OF 4/1/19

POWER TOOL SAFETY

Hand and power tools are a common part of our everyday lives and are present in nearly every industry. However, these simple tools can be hazardous and have the potential for causing severe injuries when used or maintained improperly. The employer is responsible for the safe condition of tools and equipment used by employees, but the employees have the responsibility for properly using and maintaining tools.

WEEK OF 3/25/19

OVERHEAD POWER LINE SAFETY

All construction workers should be aware of electrical hazards on the job site. When it comes to electrical safety, there is no room for carelessness or complacency. It seems as if ALL job sites have power lines running through them. Employees are using metal extension ladders, boom lifts, and scaffolds—all tools that can come into contact with overhead power lines...

WEEK OF 3/18/19

WORKING OVER WATER

Construction over and around water presents dangers both to workers and the public. Precautions specifically developed for such construction must be taken before work begins and followed throughout the project.

WEEK OF 3/11/19

HOUSEKEEPING

Housekeeping is everyone’s job - every trade, every worker, and every supervisor. Good housekeeping does more than prevent injuries - it can save you time, and it can keep your tools from being lost, damaged, or destroyed.

WEEK OF 3/4/19

SLIPS, TRIPS AND FALLS

OSHA reports slips, trips, or falls cause almost 20 percent of all workplace injuries. Slips and falls do not constitute a primary cause of fatal occupational injuries, but represent the primary cause of lost days from work. A study by Bureau of Labor Statistics in 2002 found that 22% of slip/fall incidents resulted in more than 31 days away from work.

WEEK OF 2/25/19

SILICA/DUST

Crystalline silica is a basic component of soil, sand, granite, and many other minerals. Quartz is the most common form of crystalline silica. Cristobalite and tridymite are two other forms of crystalline silica. All three forms may become respirable size particles when workers chip, cut, drill, or grind objects that contain crystalline silica.

WEEK OF 2/18/19

FALL PROTECTION

Nearly 6.5 million people work at approximately 252,000 construction sites across the nation on any given day. The fatal injury rate for the construction industry is higher than the national average for all industries. Studies show that using guardrails, fall arrest systems, safety nets, covers and restraint systems can prevent many deaths and injuries from falls.

WEEK OF 2/11/19

COLD WEATHER ILLNESSES

Many construction jobs expose employees to cold temperatures during the winter months.  It important that employees know how to protect themselves, the signs and symptoms of cold related injuries or illnesses and what to do if they occur.